An Account of the 1848 Western Santa Fe' trail George D. Brewerton with Kit Carson .

An Account of the 1848 Western Santa Fe' trail George D. Brewerton with Kit Carson .

An Account of the 1848 Western Santa Fe' trail George D. Brewerton with Kit Carson .

"Our party was made up of one hundred teamsters, nearly all of whom were young Missourians. These, with sundry traders, travelers, and Mexican herdsmen (whose duty it was to keep watch and ward over an unruly drove of about five hundred loose cattle which were to follow in our wake to the frontiers), made up a force of one hundred and thirty men, the majority of whom were sturdy, athletic fellows, well armed with rifles, and though wanting discipline, very fair material for a "free fight' with a barricade of wagons between themselves and their enemies.

As it was at the Mora that I received my first impressions of the Great Prairies..........

 

Mere words are inadequate to picture forth the vast plains which are emphatically the "Great Prairies of the Far West." I am disposed to believe that the traveler feels this more fully in approaching them, as I did, from the westward than in the easier transition which is experienced in journeying toward  them from the alternate hills and dales of the Missourian frontier, ....But here - where their western barriers, the Rocky Mountains, tower aloft like the gigantic coast of an inland sea: where Majestic steeps, many of them snow-capped or robes in clouds, seem saying to the grassy waves which skirt their pine-clad bases, " So far shalt thou come, and at our feet shall thy green expanse be stayed" it is here, I repeat, that the voyageur feels most fully that he is gazing upon an unfamiliar land..................

Our everyday mode of life upon the road was very much as follows: The camp was awakened at daybreak; and breakfast being prepared and dispatched, the cry of “Catch up!” from the wagon-master's fire warned all hands to get ready for a start. Then ensues a scene of noise and confusion which baffles description – a contest between unruly oxen who won't be yoked, and their irritated drivers who are determined that they shall. At length all is ready: and at the command “Stretch out!” each wagon falls into its appointed place, and with a universal cracking of whips we begin our march.......

http://franklinbookstore.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=1424

 

Powered By OpenCart
The Franklin Bookstore © 2020